Icebreaker: As the Wind Blows

Icebreaker: As the Wind Blows

Sometimes zombies (students) just need help discovering what they have in common in order to create friendships.  Play the icebreaker, As the Wind Blows, to help your students build face-to-face connections.

An Icebreaker to Spark Friendships

Some days sound like my classes of seventh grade English learners and emerging readers socialize too much.  But, even on these days, I sometimes notice my quieter students go from the chatty line outside my door to the rush to the cafeteria without saying a word unless it is part of the lesson.  Sure, these quieter students help to balance out the chatty ones, but I worry that they have not yet made any friends in my class, where they spend ten hours a week.  

Playing As the Wind Blows as an #icebreaker Blog post w/directions coming at @tvszed #puhsd

A post shared by Natalie Priester (@npriester) on

If you play As the Wind Blows, please share on social media and use the hashtag #tvszed and/or tag @npriester or @tvszed, and I will share it with others.  I also have a Facebook group at bit.ly/tvszFB for Teachers vs Zombies. Feel free to leave questions or suggestions below. Have fun!

 

How to Play As the Wind Blows

Learning Target:

  • Students will discover things they have in common

Overview:

  • Students sit in a circle with one student in the middle who says “The wind blows people who X.” The students who X applies to, find a new seat.  The person left standing becomes the speaker.

Game Goal:

  • Avoid being the last person to find a seat

Space:

  • Enough floor space for all students to sit in chairs in a circle. (Alternative: draw X’s on the ground using sidewalk chalk in place of chairs and play outside.)  

Supplies:

  • Chairs

Time:

  • 5-8 minutes (Remember, “Stop while they’re having fun!”)

Directions:

  1. All students, except one, sit in a circle in chairs.
  2. Remaining student (It) stands in the middle of the circle.
  3. It says, “The wind blows people who X.”  The X can be filled in with something true about It.  Here are some examples:
    1. The wind blows people who have been to Disneyland.
    2. The wind blows people who sleep in a bunk bed.
    3. The wind blows people who play on a soccer team.
  4. Students who X applies to, including It, must stand up and find a new chair (not the chair right next to him/her if possible).
  5. The remaining student becomes It.

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